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Sunday, November 21, 2010

Logos a-go-go

If you grew up in the eighties you may recall the rumour that the Proctor and Gamble logo was a satanic message.  After these rumours gained steam, P&G dropped the logo; back in 2008 one could still find a press release on their website specifically denying any unwholesome connection.  In 1995, a lawsuit by P&G  claimed that rival Amway used a voicemail system to inform customers that some PG profit went to satanic cults.  PG won this suit in 1997 to the tune of 19.25 million dollars.  Moral of the story:  Don't fuck with the Devil.

And then there's DARPA.  As we posted back in July, the IAO discontinued the use of their logo because it had "...become a lightning rod and is needlessly diverting time and attention from the critical tasks of executing that office's mission effectively and openly..."  This was due to the belief that the logo was a symbol of the Illuminati.

Of course, people see the Illuminati in everything from suns to torches to chevrons.  Illuminati-spotting is an ubiquitous game.  In that spirit, we present you with a few logos which have caught our eye over the past year.  We don't ascribe any sinister intent to these, to be honest.  But our minds are primed for this sort of thing and we just can't help associating these images with more esoteric symbolism.

Thales was a Greek philosopher. I suppose if there is a pantheon of Illuminist saints, he would in there:

Thales attempted to explain natural phenomena without reference to mythology and was tremendously influential in this respect. Almost all of the other pre-Socratic philosophers follow him in attempting to provide an explanation of ultimate substance, change, and the existence of the world—without reference to mythology. Those philosophers were also influential, and eventually Thales' rejection of mythological explanations became an essential idea for the scientific revolution. He was also the first to define general principles and set forth hypotheses, and as a result has been dubbed the "Father of Science".
 
In mathematics, Thales used geometry to solve problems such as calculating the height of pyramids and the distance of ships from the shore. He is credited with the first use of deductive reasoning applied to geometry, by deriving four corollaries to Thales' Theorem. As a result, he has been hailed as the first true mathematician and is the first known individual to whom a mathematical discovery has been attributed.

This Thales, however is a French electronic company with most of its profit coming from military contracts.  The "A" in the logo certainly evokes a stylized eye in the pyramid, ne c'est pas?  That the company is also involved in commercial satellite technology certainly adds credence to the theory that it represents an all-seeing eye in the sky.  Note to self: be on guard against the Alan Parsons Project....


Elboma Koma is a company that manufactures, installs and maintains professional refrigeration appliances.  I don't what the name means but it wouldn't sound out of place in some kind of magickal language, no?  But really, wtf?  A delta with a rerigerator in glory?  The Illuminati has gotten into the refrigeration business?  Hey, why not.  There is after all, a French company that manufactures heating appliances called Weishaupt....talk about your reconciliation of opposites, hey hey!



Freemasons:  Purveyors of fine wines and ferns.


The Gruet winery is located near Truth or Consequences New Mexico.  Founded by a Frenchman from the Champagne area, they've succeeded in making award-winning and respected wines for a good price.  But when we look at their coat of arms we can't help ourselves.

While the Gruet winery coat of arms may only suggest the Square and Compasses, the town of Apopka's logo features them outright.  This is due to the Masonic history of the town, as explained by its website

The Armed Occupation Act of 1842 brought white settlers to the Apopka area. They received 160 acres if they would settle them.

These Pioneers and those that followed the Civil War from states to the north began converting the area into what it is today.

The settlement grew, attracting developers and settlers because of  the climate and the agricultural opportunities and becoming an important trading center in the 1850s. The Masons were particularly active. Orange Lodge #36 was organized in 1857, and The Lodge building, still standing on its original site at Alabama Avenue and Highway 441, was completed in 1859.

It was around this building that the town grew in the 1860s and 1870s and ultimately became the Town of Apopka City incorporated in 1882.

Furthermore:

The City limits were measured one mile in all directions from the Masonic Lodge. The "Lodge"....is the oldest lodge room in continuous use in the State of Florida.

So. Make of all that what you will.  We'll keep doing double takes of infinite persistent amusement.

2 comments:

  1. you know, as a Freemason I keep waiting to be let in the big secret plan, but so far no dice. I gotta tell you, if you think you can get 30 guys to agree on what kind of beer to buy, let alone take over the world...
    I think you can probably relax.

    See, someone's commenting!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey, thanks for the comment freakydruid.

    This post is not so much based on the belief that Fremmasons are implanting messages in logos, but that so many people think they are. And to be honest, in France, I'm not sure they aren't. Apparently, the use of deltas in the logos of Freemasonic-owned businesses is widespread. Or so I've been told....

    I myself am a Freemason so yeah, as far as world domination goes, I'm not in on the plan. I can't even earn a decent salary, let alone a European satrapy!

    Hobasco Lodge 716 F&AM, Ithaca, NY. You?

    ReplyDelete

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